FAQ

Read this section as an introduction to handmade soap in general, and Kinder Soaps. :)

What soap would you recommend for my skin type / problem?

All the soap that you see in each Skin Type section are suitable for them. But if you really, really would like my opinion on what you could try out as a Kinder Soaps newbie, I’d recommend these:

Eczema
  • Goat’s Milk and Patchouli
  • DreamTime
  • Breakfast Bar
  • Goat’s Milk and Honey (if for use with an infant under 8 months of age)
Dry or Mature Skin
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Breakfast Bar
  • Summer Fizz
  • Tangy Lavender
Acne-Prone Skin
  • Clarity (if your skin is oily all over, and you don’t feel any tightness at all)
  • Songbird (if you have an oily T-zone, but normal or dry skin elsewhere)
  • Spiced Coffee
Sensitive Skin
  • DreamTime (if your skin is prone to redness and is easily aggravated, e.g. applying moisturizer, standing a little too long in the sun etc)
  • Breakfast Bar
  • Goat’s Milk and Honey
Babies and infants aged 8 months and below
(note: these are soaps that have no essential oils in them, as infants aren’t physically developed enough to properly metabolize the chemical components in many essential oils, especially if you’re thinking of exposing them to essential oils on a daily basis, even at low dosages in rinse-off products like soap.)
  • Breakfast Bar
  • Goat’s Milk and Honey
Normal, Problem-Free Skin

You lucky, lucky duck! Take your pick from any of the soaps here, because you’re one of the rare people who don’t have to worry about your skin freaking out. :p

How much do you charge for shipping?

Shipping rates are as follows:

West Malaysia

  • RM8 flat fee
  • Free shipping for orders valued at RM200 and above

East Malaysia

  • RM10 flat fee
  • Free shipping for orders valued at RM200 and above

International

  • RM35 flat fee

We always send out my packages via courier (right now it’s either via Skynet or Poslaju) for retail orders sent within Malaysia. International orders will be sent via Pos Malaysia’s registered parcel service.

Do you have a shop that I can visit to see your stuff?

Yup, we sure do! :D It’s located at Jaya33 in Section 14, Petaling Jaya. We also have other stockists who carry most of our wares. Visit our Store Locations page to find out more about our stockists and their contact information.

Uh oh, the item I’d like to get is out of stock. What do I do?

You can fill up our Pre-Order form to reserve your desired soap ahead of their Curing Completion Dates. Only paid Pre-Orders will be entertained.

Or better yet, visit one of our stockists! They may still have some of the things we’ve run out of at the shop and online.

When will xxx soap be ready?

For a rough idea on when your parcel will be shipped out, check the Curing Completion Dates calendar on the bottom of each page on this website.

Do you use animal fat in your soap?

Nope. I only use plant-derived oils.

Are your soaps halal?

They aren’t certified as such, but you have my word that I don’t use any form of animal fat nor other ingredients which contain animal-derived additives.

Can I use your soap for my hair?

In short, yes. Everyone in my family uses my soap from head to toe. But to be fair, all of us have short hair. So if you are concerned about tangles and you use conditioner most of the time, here’s a natural alternative for you to try: make a lemon juice rinse by mixing 1 part strained lemon juice to 1 part warm water. Rinse this through your hair after shampooing, and rinse out with warm water (just as you would with your usual conditioner). Say hello to silky soft, bouncy, shiny locks. Unfortunately I can’t say if this rinse would adversely affect those with coloured or permed hair.

Alternatively you can make a vinegar rinse by mixing 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water. It’s a cheaper alternative to using lemons, but my hubby complains of the lingering smell of vinegar in the shower when I’m done. I guess it’s not that nice to smell like a salad dressing.

Does your soap lather well?

The next time you pick up  bar of soap from the pharmacy or supermarket, check its list of ingredients. You will probably spot this one: Sodium Laureth Sulphate (SLS), or its close relative, Sodium Lauryl Sulphate. These are cheap foaming and cleansing agents that are also used to make household floor cleaners (but of course in higher percentages in such products), and they can produce copious amounts of fluffy lather which we are so accustomed to. In order to make commercially-viable ‘soap’ products, companies opt to use these ingredients to cause their products to lather and cleanse. They do clean well, but for some of us who have more sensitive skin, we find that SLS strips off our skin’s precious natural oil barrier, leaving most of us with uncomfortably dry, itchy and red patches on our skin.

In my cold process soap, the saponified vegetable oils produce lovely lather, varying from dense bubbles to fluffy ones. Different oils giving different kinds of lather. For a quick overview of which oils produce what kinds of lather, read this article.

How long do your soap bars last?

It depends on how you use and store them. Keeping them as dry as possible in between uses, resting it in a well-drained soap dish and well-ventilated room helps a lot. If your soap bar is primarily for washing your hands, most will last for about 2 months or even more. If you’re using it in the shower, it could last anything between 3 to 6 weeks.

In my family where we showered our magically-messy kids aged 2 and 3 almost 3 times a day, a single bar of soap would last them 2-3 weeks.

As for best-before dates, I’d say they’re good for a year from the time you bought them. Please try to use them up within this time frame, or all those skin-loving oils may go rancid.

How can I make my soap bar last longer?

As cold process soap bars generally tend to be softer than most commercially-produced bath products, it’s best to rest your soaps on well-drained soap dishes in between uses. Don’t let them sit in a puddle of water, or your precious soap bars will melt down into forlorn-looking puddles of goo. They’re still usable, but nowhere near as pretty as when you first got them!

As for storage, keeping your unopened bar of soap in a cool, dark and dry place would be best.

I like the scents in your soap so much that I can’t bear to use them. I keep them in my drawer/cupboard instead. How long can I leave them there?

Firstly, I’ll have you know that the soap bars in your drawer are very, very sad… Because they want to do good things to your skin, and are happiest when being used regularly. But if you really, really want to use them to make your clothes smell nice, I’d say that they’re good for about a year after you buy them.

I heard there is a Points and Rewards system here. How does it work?

Read our dedicated page for this feature – we hope you’ll find it beneficial!

What is “cold-process” soap?

Very simply put, the cold process method of soapmaking involves mixing fats (whether from animal or plant sources) with specific amount of a strong alkaline solution, usually sodium hydroxide. The chemical reaction between these two ingredients is known as saponification, which, if performed correctly, results in what we all know as soap at the end. Additives such as fragrance and colourants may be added to the liquid soap mixture before it hardens to enhance its beneficial properties, or to pretty it up. After 24 hours from the time it is poured into a mold, the soap is sliced and allowed to cure for 3-4 weeks before it is ready for use. This is to help the soap harden and last longer in the shower (curing allows the soap to lose some of its original water content).

It is completely different from melt-and-pour soap, where one begins with a store-bought, pre-made base, melts it down, mixes in other desired ingredients, pours it into a mold and the soap is ready to use almost overnight.

As a personal preference, I only use vegetable oils (no animal fats), pure essential oils and natural colourants such as clay. The main reason being is that I want to stay clear of known skin irritants which are so commonly found in commercially-produced ‘soap’ bars, which really are detergent-based.

8 thoughts on “FAQ

  1. suba says:

    hi really admire ur effort in helping the others. ur articles are great & interesting. Actually where can i purchase sodium hydoxide(lye) in m’sia? thanking u in advance

  2. Jane. K says:

    Dear Michelle,
    (My condolences to you and your family thru the situation you re facing now.)

    It’s extremely refreshing and indeed blessed that I came across your page while sourcing some information on my soap making this past midnight . I am a lady who too am at the verge of startin up a soap company of my own and consider it a great blessing to come across ppl who share the same vision to of doing the best we can for the environment and for the the community. It will we great if we we could actually take an opportunity would love to meet up with you perhaps to discuss our passion and who knows we may see if we could work something out together in the near future . Do email me at shangjeen@hotmail.com. or you can reach me at my number 0173171377( Shang Jeen) Thnk you

  3. Ad says:

    Are the soaps OK to be used to cleanse the face? Would it be to harsh for the face?

    I’ve just got back from Taiwan. There’s a famous soap shop there too, called 阿原肥皂. Hope your business can grow to that extent some day!

    P/s: Just found out that you are my senior from Warwick!

    • Michelle says:

      Happy new year Ad! Heeeey, great to know you’re a fellow Warwickian! Which year were you in? I graduated in 2002.

      Yes most all-natural soaps are gentle enough to use for the face, although I would advise against the more exfoliating ones that contain seeds or coffee grinds, for example. But to be safe you can stick to those which have essential oils like lavender, patchouli, tea tree (if your skin is the oily kind). Goat’s milk soaps in general are very mild too.

      And thank you for your kind wishes for my business! I don’t read chinese, but I’m guessing that you’re referring to the Ah Yuan soap from Taiwan? I’ve seen them being sold in Malaysia too, mostly in organic stores. I’m glad they’re doing well!

  4. Ad says:

    Hello Michelle. I became a Warwickian in Sept 2002. So I guess I hadn’t seen you around in Warwick.

    My aunt bought us some of your soaps to try. I’ve been using the Goats Milk and Patchouli Soap for about 2 weeks and I love it. A few ‘long term’ itchy spots on my legs cured and recovered. No more scratching!

    I have a bar of Charcoal and Tea Tree with me. But, I don’t see it listed on the product page. Anyway, I will try it after using the Goat Milk one. As a suggestion, how about adding charcoal into current Tea Tree, Lemongrass and Lime Soap? Do you think it works?

    • Michelle says:

      Awesome! Glad to hear that the goats milk and patchouli bar helped clear up those itchy spots! Yeah I’ve been a little lax on updating my products page lately, that’s why you don’t see the Charcoal Tea Tree bar listed there (internet here can be painfully slow! :( ) That’s an interesting proposition on adding charcoal to the Tea Tree, Lemongrass and Lime bar (yes it’s feasible and would be effective in clearing up congested skin), but I’m actually testing out a new charcoal soap recipe with some other essential oils for another purifying type of soap. Will blog about that in the near future, watch this space! ;)

      Oh do you know a Su Hsien from Warwick? What did you study there? I was a Management Science graduate. Bestest choose-what-you-want-to-study degree around, I think! :D

  5. Ashley says:

    Hi Michelle,
    Ever since first time using your soap, i can’t wait for the next and next shower time! it sounds funny but it’s true. My shower time become happier and more fun now. Thanks to you and your team.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>